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Are You Protecting Your Parks from Pet Waste?

Are You Protecting Your Parks from Pet Waste?

February 27, 2019

Dog waste has real, long- lasting effects on communities and their inhabitants. Aside from the unpleasant sight and odor, humans are susceptible to a handful of diseases spread through contact with dog waste including hookworms, roundworms, tapeworms, parvo and salmonellosis (salmonella).

A common misconception is that dog waste is a natural fertilizer, but to the contrary contains poisonous contaminants that are harmful to both land and water.

Dog waste left in public spaces is either carried away and washed into storm drains or dehydrates into the earth. Phosphorous found in dog waste is harmful to waterways and is a major cause of hypertrophication; an excessive growth of algae and that depletes oxygen from the water. This process kills fish and other living creatures.

Rats in urban areas are known to feed on dog waste as a primary food source, and when left to dehydrate or evaporate, parasites from feces can continue to grow in the soil for years.

How can you make a difference?

  1. Do your part to make public spaces more usable. Parks and public facilities should utilize Pet Waste Eliminator Stations at several points of convenience.
  2. Always keep your waste stations fully stocked. Join our discount pet waste bag refill program so you never run out of bags.
  3. Educate park goers of the importance of picking up after their pets. Not only is it sanitary, but this action complies with most park and recreation center ordinances.
  4. Utilize signs throughout your public space reminding pet owners to pick up behind their dogs.